Cerebral mechanisms of prosodic integration: evidence from connected speech

Abstract : Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and long connected speech stimuli, we addressed the question of neuronal networks involved in prosodic integration by comparing (1) differences in brain activity when hearing connected speech stimuli with high and low degrees of prosodic expression; (2) differences in brain activity in two different diotic listening conditions (normal speech delivery to both ears, i.e., NN; and low-pass-filtered speech delivery to both ears, i.e., FF); and (3) effects of high and low degrees of prosodic information in the NN and FF conditions. Twelve right-handed French men listened passively to the stimuli. Each stimulus induced a specific cerebral network, the flat one weakening activations, which were mainly reduced to the bilateral STG for both listening conditions. High degrees of prosodic information were found to trigger right specific activations in a wider neuronal network involved in speech integration (such as BA44, BA21-22 and BA39-40) than low degrees of prosodic information did. More precisely, the right BA44 was found to be specifically involved in the process of F(0) modulations, which are the main acoustic correlate of prosody. Not only do the results achieved in the present experiment using 30-s-long connected speech stimuli show the involvement of a bilateral neuronal network but they also strongly suggest that high degrees of prosodic information elicit activations in a wider neuronal network involved in speech perception than low degrees of prosodic information do.
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Article dans une revue
NeuroImage, Elsevier, 2005, 24 (4), pp.937--947
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http://hal.univ-lille3.fr/hal-01240623
Contributeur : Sylvain Clement <>
Soumis le : mercredi 9 décembre 2015 - 13:18:21
Dernière modification le : mardi 16 janvier 2018 - 15:54:12

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  • HAL Id : hal-01240623, version 1

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I Hesling, S Clement, M Bordessoules, M Allard. Cerebral mechanisms of prosodic integration: evidence from connected speech. NeuroImage, Elsevier, 2005, 24 (4), pp.937--947. 〈hal-01240623〉

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